more on subsidies for renewables

Maybe it is just me, but whenever I seem to post something, I notice 5 more articles or references about the same topic.  Here is another interesting take on the whole subsidy question.  Basically when we subsidies renewable energy, are we doing anything different than when we subsidies other industries in the past?  Primer here:

http://green.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/09/22/whose-subsidies-trump-whose/

and the pdf of the analysis here:

http://www.dblinvestors.com/documents/DBL_energy_subsidies_paper.pdf

and to spoil it all:

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2 Responses to more on subsidies for renewables

  1. John says:

    More commentary on Solyndra, the risky nature of federal loan guarantees, and the motivation behind government support of the solar sector:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/24/opinion/the-phony-solyndra-scandal.html

  2. Cooper Gill says:

    I have a few problems with the study, namely the dishonest treatment of inflation and % of federal budget. The authors acknowledge the change in budget distribution from 1918 to now, but their treatment to make it “apples to apples” is false. BY multiplying expenditures to inflation, the budget is also multiplied by the same expenditure. % of budget comparisons are not deceiving because of inflation, it is because of the explosive growth of social spending that has dwarfed any technical spending in modern budgets. It hides the fact that alot of money has been invested in renewables, while magnifying the expenditures by including depletion costs. Solar is not produced from a finite source, therefore comparing to a resource that is finite is “apples to oranges” to begin with. Also, I found it interesting that USDA subsidies were NOT included for biofuels, despite knowing both the USDA subsidy amount and the amount of ethanol consumed as a fuel source.

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